Lessons from Business, Medicine and Life

This blog started as a way to empower doctors and others involved in healthcare to take charge of their lives and recognise their skills as being transferable to other industries-

Including business and entrepreneurship.

Most of my time the past few years has been spent reading and following business leaders to learn how they tick, and it’s amazing how relevant their lessons are for managing your lives on the wards, in clinics, at your medtech startup, and even in your personal life.

Business is an uncertain world; yet it’s powerful to remember that, generally, lives are not at stake in this situation- at least not with the immediacy that’s faced in the chemotherapy unit, for example.

Remember to arm yourself with your number one tool: PERSPECTIVE: and take time to figure out what values you hold dearest; what frustrates you most; what strengths and weaknesses you think you have; and how you can serve the world best through your strengths and individuality.

This is an intro to an ongoing series on productivity and insights from my readings on how to take charge in your life.

Feel free to let me know how you go; we’d love to hear your success stories if you’ve been inspired by one of these people, or of course, by something you’ve read on The Medical Startup 🙂

Cheers and good luck!!

#themedicalstartuptips

Job Opportunity: Next Practice Health Looking for GPs

If you’re a GP in Australia wanting to work with a patient-focused practice with novel tech solutions, read on…

 

 

Next Practice is here. And we are changing the face of healthcare.

Confronted at once by significant strain and profound opportunity, healthcare must transform for the future.

We are artfully creating a new kind of General Practice by reducing the limitations of time, resources and inefficiency to ensure not just “Best Practice” care but “Next Practice” care.
Our goal is nothing less than the best General Practice experience on Planet Earth, and we are looking for like-minded GP partners to join our movement.

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Our Offering

Whether you are opening a new practice or transforming an existing one, becoming a Next Practice Partner allows you to retain the joy of running a small business with the reassurance of a larger company behind you. Our aim simply is to give you more time to deliver quality, patient-centred care and increase your return.

An Inviting Environment

Next Practice have re-defined the experience of a “visit to the GP”. Our unique design welcomes patients, inviting them to engage in their health, whilst ensuring a functional clinic space that is a delight to work in. Freed by technology of administrative tasks, practice staff are able to engage in deeper collaboration with patients, family and other treating clinicians.

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Practice Management Support

As a partner of Next Practice, you have access to the considerable expertise of our larger business.
This includes planning, building and property maintenance, accreditation, accounting, HR, Marketing, Compliance and IT. As part of a larger network, you also have access to shared resourcing for administrative tasks and enhanced purchasing power with suppliers.

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Your Wellbeing

We well understand the stress of General Practice and are determined about supporting your wellbeing. We have developed an innovative program of personal and professional development designed to improve job satisfaction and work-life balance. As part of a network of inspirational GPs, you will have the knowledge that you are part of a movement bigger than yourself.

 

Curious?

Do you want to leave your fingerprint on a new kind of care?
Check out our interactive website at www.nextpracticehealth.com
Then contact Terry today by email at terry@nextpracticehealth.com or call 0498 488 059.

All images and job listing courtesy of Next Practice Health.

This job listing is sponsored. If you’re interested in advertising your job opportunity or other events on The Medical Startup, please contact us for rates and more details. 

World First: 3D-Printed Tibia Successfully Inserted Into Man’s Leg During Surgery

A team of Australian surgeons have successfully implanted a 3D-printed tibia into a 27-year-old man’s leg.

 

Photo courtesy of The Age.

 

The Princess Alexandra Hospital in Brisbane, Australia, collaborated with the Queensland University of Technology with the design of the original polymer and “scaffold,” and with the printing technology in Singapore.*

The young father had suffered a life-threatening osteomyelitis, and faced above-knee amputation as the alternative.

It’s going to be fascinating following the journey of this man’s recovery, and hearing more and more stories of others successfully receiving 3D-printed bone and tissue. Both metropolitan and regional locations will soon be able to have these resources on hand (a 3D-printed tibia is pictured from Mackay Base Hospital’s 3D-printer here).

For more information, head to The Age and the ABC News.

*We’d love to credit the site in Singapore where the printing for this surgery took place!

Melbourne Social Enterprise Pioneers Model: Giving Through Medical Education

There are many ways to give through your business or startup.

Who knew that by educating yourself for your fellowship exams, you are also helping by giving to those less fortunate? 

PhysEd gives you this sense of purpose.

                

Two Melbourne medical doctors decided to give through their medical education company, PhysEd, a two-week intensive preparation course for doctors preparing for the Royal Australasian College of Physicians’ Basic Physician Training Written Exam.

         

Inspired by ethicist Peter Singer’s book and organisation, The Life You Can Save, PhysEd gives 5% of revenue to charity, donating over five figures in its first year. The specialty exams are a gruelling time in any doctor’s life, and attending a course has statistically shown to improve your chance of passing. Having gone through the exams themselves, the founders know the high standards expected of course speakers and exam candidates. With this in mind, PhysEd incorporates a practical, immersive approach to multiple-choice question preparation, including a weekend MCQ intensive midway through the course, and high-quality, experienced presenters from many of Melbourne’s top teaching hospitals.

Let’s face it- going through the exams is a very competitive, self-focused time, spanning over two years of doctors’ lives, which can take away from the meaning of medicine- to give to others who need your knowledge. Medicine is about giving, yet, the competitive environment of training and striving to be your best on that one exam day can sap away one’s energy and original sense of purpose for medicine. PhysEd’s giving model helps you feel that you’re not alone- your studying is not in vain, just for your own score and knowledge – it’s helping others, including companies such as Medicins Sans Frontieres and Against Malaria.

To find out more and register, including a free, fully-equipped doctors’ briefcase for the Part 2 exams with full registration(!), head to physed.com.au

For an inspiring book from a pioneering social entrepreneur, read our review of TOMS shoes founder Blake Mycoskie’s book here

Photo credits: physed.com.au

Book Review: “Start Something That Matters” by Blake Mycoskie, TOMS Founder

This book is a must-read.

"Start Something That Matters" by Blake Mycoskie. Pic: themedicalstartup.com
Pic: themedicalstartup.com

Most of you would have heard of TOMS. Many of you perhaps own a pair or two. There’s a fascinating story behind it.

Continue reading “Book Review: “Start Something That Matters” by Blake Mycoskie, TOMS Founder”

New Zealand Clinicians’ Challenge Open For Entries

If you’re a clinician in New Zealand with a great idea, the Clinicians’ Challenge may be right for you.

1,100 delegates attending HiNZ this week. HiNZ Awards at Shed10, Auckland, sponsored by Microsoft. Pic: The Medical Startup
Attendees mingling at HiNZ 2016. Pic: The Medical Startup

The Clinicians’ Challenge aims to help healthcare workers from all disciplines improve the lives of patients through innovative projects. There are two categories: New Idea, or Active Project/Development. Prizewinners will share in $20,000NZD worth of funding, supported by HiNZ and the Ministry of Health, New Zealand.

Last year’s winners who presented at HiNZ include:

  • anaesthetics registrar Mark Fletcher’s New Idea award for collecting the most relevant big data efficiently across elective surgery lists;
  • pharmacist Amber Young for her New Ideas award-winning medication information project, integrating both tech and paper to tailor medication summaries for patients in an efficient and visually optimised format
  • Yvonne McFarlane, a resident at Dunedin Hospital who developed an idea for a simple one-page handover list that can be integrated into existing EMRs; and
  • public health physician Nick Eichler and his Auckland Public Health Service colleagues, with their TeleDOT electronic medication monitoring system for tuberculosis patients. By improving education and adherence, TeleDOT also aims to reduce the transport burden for patients and healthcare workers across the country while undergoing lengthy treatment.

Entries for the Clinicians Challenge close Friday 16 June- visit here to enter.

Other opportunities for the annual HiNZ and NZ Nursing Informatics Conferences are also open til Friday 16 June, including speaker and paper/abstract submissions. More details at hinz.org.nz.

Read our recaps of last year’s events at Day 1, 2 and 3

 

Melbourne startup Nebula Health Raises $250,000 in Seed Funding For Best Perioperative Patient Care

What makes patients’ lives easier?

Having clear, up to date communication with their doctor and treating team.

The problem is, time pressures and administrative structures in most hospitals and clinics make this difficult both for patients and clinicians.

Australian surgeons Dr Paul Paddle and Dr Chandrashan Perera have created a solution for this. Nebula Health delivers smartphone reminders and advice via app directly from the surgeon to the patient, improving the quality of pre-operative care, post-op recovery and long-term health of their patients, in an easy-to-use and efficient manner.

Nebula Health's new patient-focused app will help patients prepare for and recover well from surgery with clear instructions tailored to each patient's individual needs. Photo courtesy of Nebula Health.
Nebula Health’s new patient-focused app will help patients prepare for and recover well from surgery, with clear instructions tailored to each patient’s unique needs. Photo courtesy of Nebula Health.

As Chief Medical Officer Dr Paddle explains, “The concept for this app was borne out of my own experience and frustration. As a practicing ENT surgeon, I strive to check in on my patients at every step, before and after their surgery. However, in the time-pressured realities of medical practice today, it’s often not possible. With this app, my patients receive personalised directions every step of the way. In return, I receive real-time notifications of their compliance. As a result, my patients have more confidence in my abilities, are more satisfied and have better health outcomes.”

Frustration with the limits of current best patient care are what drive startups formed by doctors, nurses and other clinicians. Perioperative medicine is a standout opportunity for healthtech innovation, given the enormous breadth of surgical patients and cases, spanning from neonatal to paediatrics and adult surgery, and the non-surgical complications that can occur (such as cardiac events) amidst the high turnover of operative cases. A precision medicine solution like Nebula’s app could potentially also help those patients on waiting lists who are anxious about surgery or wanting advice in between appointments.

Melbourne Accelerator Launch Party 2016. Photo: The Medical Startup
Melbourne Accelerator Launch Party 2016. Photo: The Medical Startup

Since completing their time with the Melbourne Accelerator Program (MAP), Nebula have visited Silicon Valley with the other MAP graduates and iterated the initial concept of their product into a helpful perioperative app. What was the journey like as a clinician and startup founder? “We tested thirty (surgical) patients using a prototype. Feedback was overwhelmingly positive, and it encouraged us to develop this concept into a market-ready product.” explains Dr Chandrashan Perera , Nebula’s CEO. “Patient testimonials from this trial turned six surgeons into early customers. From this traction, we were able to close our seed round. This funding will allow us to grow the team and scale our services to more patients.” Indeed, at least two more medical doctors have joined Nebula‘s team, and Nebula’s vision has impressed angel investors including Rod Lyle, a board member of ASX-listed medical technology company Pro Medicus.

It’s been exciting following Nebula Health’s rapid journey from the Melbourne Accelerator Program (MAP).  Other medical successes include compatriots CNSDose, a pharmacogenetics company who are now part of the Texas Medical Center’s Innovation Accelerator, and other graduates of the MAP program.

Currently, Nebula Health are looking for more surgeons in hospitals and clinics who are interested in their software. For a demo or more information, please contact Li (at) nebulahealth.com.

Congratulations and best wishes to the team!

What It’s Like Attending Your First Hackathon

No matter your level of experience – or self-perceived lack of- hackathons are a great way for you to get started in tech.

At hackathons, you meet others interested in a good cause or tech solution for a pressing problem. Think “build a tech product in two days” and you get the idea. They’re usually themed; for example, Healthhack in Melbourne last year; the internationally-run Hacking Health (in Brisbane this year) and even food hackathons and fintech hacks in various cities. You’re usually presented with a problem to solve, either in advance of the event, or at the start of the event itself. Run as competitions, prizes and opportunities are usually on offer, ranging from prize money to course scholarships and introductions to advisors and mentors.

I’d bookmarked a ton of hackathons across Australia that kept cropping up at the wrong time; so it was a nice surprise when I Googled “hackathons” while visiting New York, and found out about AngelHack’s “Women in Tech Demo Day.

The Flatiron District, Saturday morning! Pic: The Medical Startup
The Flatiron District, Saturday morning! Pic: The Medical Startup

Continue reading “What It’s Like Attending Your First Hackathon”

Creative Spotlight: Jewellery Inspired By Neuroscience, by Luke Maninov Hammond of Queensland Brain Institute

You’d be amazed by the treasures you find on Instagram.

If art and design can tell stories to engage a captive audience beyond science and medicine, Luke Maninov Hammond has done a stellar job.

I came across a snapshot of Luke’s designs via the Queensland Brain Institute’s Instagram. Luke’s work with fluorescence microscopy at the QBI has inspired his incredible jewellery designs and prints, which he has exhibited recently at Pieces of Eight gallery in Melbourne and will soon be showing at Brisbane’s Artisan Gallery from June 15.

Luke: "This signature ring simultaneously represents the invisible worlds of cellular machinery, marine life, and dynamic connectivity within the brain. Designed as a pair, this engagement ring holds a 1.6ct Australian parti sapphire in 18ct yellow gold, surrounded by three brilliant white diamonds. Combined, the pair form a completed circle surrounding the sapphire with a golden halo set with six diamonds." Image copyright Luke Maninov Hammond
Beneath The Surface engagement ring. Luke: “This signature ring simultaneously represents the invisible worlds of cellular machinery, marine life, and dynamic connectivity within the brain. Designed as a pair, this engagement ring holds a 1.6ct Australian parti sapphire in 18ct yellow gold, surrounded by three brilliant white diamonds. Combined, the pair form a completed circle surrounding the sapphire with a golden halo set with six diamonds.” Image copyright Luke Maninov Hammond

As well as at his exhibitions, some of Luke’s work can be purchased at beneaththesurfaceprints.bigcartel.com, with profits going towards schizophrenia research. He’s also at www.lukemaninov.com, and on Instagram @lukemaninov and Facebook www.facebook.com/lukemaninovjewellery. Luke kindly provided insights for us about the mix of art, design and neuroscience while preparing for a new role at Columbia University, New York City.

Can you tell us about your neuroscience career?

Continue reading “Creative Spotlight: Jewellery Inspired By Neuroscience, by Luke Maninov Hammond of Queensland Brain Institute”

Celebrate Crazy Socks for Docs Day on June 1st

“June 1st. #CrazySocks4Docs. But not just for Docs only. This day is for nurses, dentists, pharmacists, social workers, physiotherapists, psychologists, dietitians, speech pathologists, audiologists, respiratory therapists, anaesthesia techs, paramedics, medical students, veterinarians and all other specialties that work in the health care industry for patients. Doctors are dying by their own hands. The overall physician […]”

via Crazy Socks for Docs — Dr Eric Levi

Thank you to Dr Eric Levi for your articles on your blog, which recently relate to physician suicides and the challenges we face as healthcare workers in a challenging industry.

Embrace your personality and your colleagues’ health this June 1st. Wear odd socks